Barney: “I Love You” Never Gets Old

What’s not to love about the over-sized, oversensitive, lovable, cuddly purple dinosaur? I remember when Barney first came onto the screen, singing his famous, “I love you, you love me, we’re a happy family!” song.  Every time I listen to it, it still makes me smile. No wonder this show is still on PBS and has been running strong since 1992.  Although Barney has been criticized in the past, Yale researchers Dorothy and Jerome Singer have discovered that the shows contain a great deal of age-appropriate material, and have called the program a “model of what preschool television should be.”

In every show, Barney starts out as a stuffed toy, but then comes to life. He teaches kids important lessons about manners, counting, numbers, letters, and imagination.  Barney’s friends often visit the show and tell stories to the children or take them on adventures.  Other friends that appear on the show include B.J. and Baby Bop.  Baby Bop constantly loses her blankie, but Barney always helps her find it.  Barney also has a bag of goodies in every episode, which is known as the Barney Bag.

In every episode, Barney loves and wants everyone to have a good time.  If you are craving even more Barney interaction, click here for a fun website where you can play some pretty spectacular games.  If your child is into Barney, be sure to check out our selection of Barney toys. We have plush dolls, DVDs, party supplies, and more.  In the words of Barney himself, “What a super-deeeee-duper idea!”

Exploring Your World with Sid

Science was never my thing in school. In fact, I talked my way out of dissecting a worm in the 3rd grade. The teacher let me do some other tasks that counted in place of the dissection.  However, when I watch Sid the Science kid, I am intrigued by the fun and interesting way that they present science. Each episode is loaded with information regarding the scientific experiment and methods for observation and can be categorized according to weeks.

The first week focuses on scientific tools and concepts, including observing, charts, measuring, and estimation.  The second week focuses on transformation and change, including decay and growth, melting and freezing, and the effects of heat. The third week focuses on the senses. The fourth week focuses on health. The fifth week focuses on simple machines. The sixth week focuses on science that you can observe in your backyard. The seventh week focuses on the human body. The eighth week focuses on the weather.

All of these episodes are designed to engage the curiosity in your little ones and to help them figure out why things work the way that they do.  For even more fun ideas and games, click here.  I enjoyed playing “Snow Search” myself, and digging up objects in the snow. Other games include matching up snowflake halves, where kids learn about symmetry. For more cool stuff, see our kid’s online toy store.  You can also check Sid’s page and find some cool pajamas (pictured above) which you can also personalize and keep your child warm at the same time!

Maya & Miguel: Double Delight or Double Trouble?

Scholastic Entertainment has created yet another awesome show that spans across cultures. “Maya and Miguel” does an excellent job of portraying Latino culture.  Maya and Miguel Santos are two young fraternal twins that love to have adventures in their community and at school.

For instance, in one episode, Maya encourages her friend Maggie to run for class president.  Maggie wanted to place pink puff balls on the tops of pencils and change all of the white paper in the school to pink paper.  However, upon further examination of her motives, Maggie realized that she was not good at the things that truly matter, like paying attention to other people’s problems.  One she realized this she gladly stopped running for class president and gave the nomination to Simon, a fellow classmate.

The show does an excellent job of teaching about diversity.  It also places emphasis on serving the family and community, which is a great message for any child to hear. Click here more fun and interactive games with Maya and Miguel.

For even more cool stuff, why not try kids backpacks? We also have clothing, birthday invitations, and more, all of which you can personalize.  In the words of Maya,  “¡Éso es!” (That’s it!).

Caillou Holds the Character Card

With most of the holidays behind us, it is a good time to reflect on friends, family, and more.  If you have good friends, most likely your friends have great character.  Many people are drawn to those with great character.

Caillou was a character that was created in 1990 by French author Christine L’Heureux and illustrator Hélène Desputeaux.  Christine wanted to encourage children to develop their own unique characteristics while growing in peace with others and the world around them.  She also wanted to depart from the normal practice of using animals in children’s books, and instead used a more identifiable component- humans themselves.  Her reasoning was that children could better relate to the stories that she was telling with a human, instead of an animal. Was she right? How does your little one relate to Caillou?  Feel free to leave your comments below.

Caillou encourages your children to explore the world around them, to use their imagination, and to have adventures.  There’s nothing like using your imagination to solve a problem as opposed to playing hours of shoot ‘em up video games.  Which way would you rather have your child spend his or her time?  Click here to check out fun games and how to build with Caillou.

Last but not least, for cool Caillou stuff, check out the items on our website. All of the clothing can be personalized. It’s pretty much just awesome.